Truth Telling, Deceit and Lying in Cases of Advanced Dementia

Rob George

  • Abstract

    Telling the truth is an integral part of every relationship. If people are not told the truth, it is hard for them to function effectively in society. In health care, if clinicians lie to patients, then patients are unable to make informed decisions. Such practice compromises patients’ autonomy. Therefore, the prevailing view in health care is that clinicians should be truthful at all times and are obliged to provide full and honest disclosure. However, there may be exceptions to that general rule. This article is the first in a regular series of ethical discussions relating to palliative and end-of-life care. It explores the principle of truth telling in relation to an 80-year-old woman, Martha, with advanced, multi-infarct dementia. When Martha suffers further infarcts, her cognitive ability temporarily worsens. Martha’s fluctuating level of cognitive ability means that other people have to make best-interest decisions on her behalf. However, there is conflict within her family as to what are in Martha’s best interests. This article examines whether it is always in patients’ best interests to be told the truth and whether situations exist where lying may be justified. Conflicts of interest: none

  • Contributors

    Rob George

    Affiliations

    Correct at article publish date

    Rob George is Professor of Palliative Care, Cicely Saunders Institute, King’s College London, School of Medicine, and Consultant in Palliative Medicine, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London. Email: rob.george@kcl.ac.uk

    Original publishing information

    • Publisher: St Christopher's Hospice
    • Publish date: 01/01/2011
    • Volume: 1
    • Issue: 1

    Permissions: © 2015, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions2015

  • Downloads

Full article access

To download and read the full article you need to log in

Not yet registered? Registration is free and easy.

Register online now

St Christopher's education events

National Conferences

on topical subjects

Find out more