End of Life Journal Archives

Content tagged with Dementia

Dementia special interest group: shared learning across dementia, palliative and end-of-life care domains

Karen Harrison Dening, Marie Cooper

There is a growing impetus to improve care for people with dementia at the end of life and facilitate better access to palliative care. Some settings and services are concerned that they are ill equipped to care for this group of people, in respect to environment and knowledge and skills.... Read full article

Acceptability of Namaste Care for patients with advanced dementia being cared for in an acute hospital setting

Kimberley St John, Jonathan Koffman

Background Despite a quarter of acute hospital beds being occupied by people with dementia, many hospitals lack appropriate services to meet their holistic needs. Namaste Care is a sensory programme that has been developed to meet the spiritual needs of people in the more advanced stages of dementia. It has... Read full article

Eating/Feeding Issues in Dementia: Improving the Dining Experience

Louisa Stone

People with dementia can have problems eating/feeding, which puts them at risk of malnutrition. There are various reasons why people with dementia find eating and/or feeding problematic, including difficulty co-ordinating movements in order to get food into their mouths, difficulty maintaining attention on eating, dysphagia, level of cognitive and physical... Read full article

Palliative Care And Advanced Dementia: The Croydon Project

Victor Pace, Sharon Scott

Advanced dementia is associated with a high symptom burden. However, people with advanced dementia and their carers are less likely to be cared for by specialist palliative care services than people with other conditions such as cancer. The traditional model of specialist palliative care, with its high level of symptom... Read full article

Perception of Dignity in Older People and at The End of Life

Julie Vosit-Steller, Jenna Swinkin, Katie McCabe

The impact of illness, age, treatment and a terminal prognosis can erode a patient’s sense of dignity and reduce quality of life. Maintaining patient dignity has always been considered synonymous with nursing practice. However, there is minimal information relating to how best nurses can promote and maintain a patient’s sense... Read full article

Advance Decisions to Refuse Treatment in Cases of Dementia

Joanna Davies, Rob George

Evaluating someone’s mental capacity in relation to advance decisions to refuse treatment can be a challenge for health professionals, particularly in cases of dementia. The Mental Capacity Act 2005 clarifies and formalises the functional assessment of capacity. It aims to protect individual autonomy and counter the assumption that, just because... Read full article

Living With People Who Have Dementia and Faecal Incontinence

Nykki Hetherton

As the population ages, the number of people with dementia will increase. Although faecal incontinence (FI) is not always present in this patient group, its occurrence, in combination with urinary incontinence, is a prognostic indicator of advanced disease. A previous article explored the topic of FI in the context of... Read full article

Faecal Incontinence in Advanced Dementia: The Nursing Role

Nykki Hetherton

Faecal incontinence is one of the prognostic indicators for the terminal stages of dementia. However, there is minimal information on this distressing symptom in the context of cognitive decline. Faecal incontinence in dementia is often under-reported, under-estimated and poorly assessed and managed, despite being a potentially treatable condition. It has... Read full article

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