End of Life Journal Archives

Content tagged with Communication

Nursing assessment of anxiety and mood disturbance in a palliative patient

Sarah Combes

Anxiety can be described as a feeling of worry or apprehension about uncertain future events; it is a normal sensation that everyone experiences at times (Stevenson 2010). Feeling anxious can be beneficial as it stimulates the fight or flight response, and helps us adapt to minor stressors such as sitting... Read full article

Role of Acute Oncology in the Transition to Palliative Care

Claire S Nunn

Patients with cancer may attend hospital emergency departments as a result of complications of their disease process and treatment, e.g. sepsis, hypercalcaemia or nausea and vomiting. In addition, patients with undiagnosed cancer can also present at emergency departments when they become symptomatic. The acute care culture within hospitals means that... Read full article

Encouraging/Supporting Dying Parents to Talk to Their Children

Steve Marshall, Julia Manning, Sally Mercer

Communicating with children about the anticipated death of a parent can be very challenging, even for experienced palliative care professionals. It can be particularly difficult for dying parents to discuss the fact that they are dying with their children. Consequently, they may adopt an overly positive stance in order to... Read full article

Heart-Failure Patients’ Thoughts and Fears Concerning Dying

Kimberley Reeman, Helen Noble

Patients with heart failure experience a variety of reactions to living with a chronic yet terminal disease. These range from acceptance of death to fear of death. Heart-failure patients have a high symptom burden, which adversely affects their quality of life. Patients are very concerned about the burden that their... Read full article

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