End of Life Journal Archives

Content tagged with Clinical Skills

Communication vignettes: ‘Being with’ a patient who is distressed

Helen Scott

Communicating with dying people means more than just imparting information. It is about being physically and emotionally present with patients. The following communication vignette deals with the issue of ‘being with’ dying patients, as defined by Dame Cicely Saunders, the founder of the modern hospice movement. Dame Cicely Saunders wrote... Read full article

Altered Sense of Body Image in Palliative and End-of-Life Care

Amanda Stamper

In palliative and end-of-life care, holistic patient assessment involves considering patients’ physical, psychological, social and spiritual concerns. As part of psychological assessment, it is important to discuss with patients their perception of body image and whether it is affecting their interactions with others and their ability to live their life... Read full article

Communication Vignettes: She wants her misery to end, nurse!

Bruno Bubna-Kasteliz

In palliative and end-of-life care, holistic patient assessment involves considering patients’ physical, psychological, social and spiritual concerns. As part of psychological assessment, it is important to discuss with patients their perception of body image and whether it is affecting their interactions with others and their ability to live their life... Read full article

Communication vignettes: ‘What have I done to deserve this?’

Helen Scott

Patients who ask ‘What have I done to deserve this?’ are usually articulating spiritual distress. However, nurses often feel uncomfortable discussing spiritual concerns and have difficulty recording spiritual assessments (The Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute and Royal College of Physicians, 2009). That may be due, in part, to the fact... Read full article

Communication vignettes: ‘You must get her out of bed, nurse!’

Helen Scott

The advanced stages of disease can be associated with a great deal of distress for patients and their loved ones (Lobb et al, 2006; Murray et al, 2010; Candy et al, 2011). For example, families/friends of terminally ill people can become confused, fearful, experience despair and helplessness (Maher and Hemming,... Read full article

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