End of Life Journal Archives

Content tagged with Clinical Review

End-of-life care for patients on haemodialysis

Mitesh Patel, Jyoti Baharani

Many patients with chronic illness will require end-of-life (EOL) care. This is the case with many patients who suffer from chronic kidney disease. When patients start haemodialysis (HD), the nuances of care for kidney disease take over. Often, when these patients reach the EOL, this is not always recognised, resulting... Read full article

Death and Dying in Intensive Care: Emotional Labour of Nurses

Lucy Ryan, Jane Seymour

Intensive care unit (ICU) nursing is associated with emotional labour. ICU nurses regularly care for dying patients. End-of-life care (EoLC) can be a major cause of stress in ICU, particularly in relation to the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment, managing the transition from curative care to EoLC and dealing with the... Read full article

The Importance of Recognising Depression Following a Stroke

Helen Brewerton

Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the UK and the single most common cause of disability. Depression following a stroke occurs in approximately one-third of stroke sufferers. It is a distressing symptom and has been found to have a significant effect on post-stroke morbidity and mortality.... Read full article

The Barriers to Organ and Tissue Donation in Palliative Care

Mary Spencer

Discussions about organ/tissue donation are now expected to become part of end-of-life care discussions, when appropriate. It is commonly perceived that terminally ill people are not eligible to donate their organs/ tissues. However, that is not the case. Palliative care patients can donate various tissues, including corneal tissue, and in... Read full article

Living With People Who Have Dementia and Faecal Incontinence

Nykki Hetherton

As the population ages, the number of people with dementia will increase. Although faecal incontinence (FI) is not always present in this patient group, its occurrence, in combination with urinary incontinence, is a prognostic indicator of advanced disease. A previous article explored the topic of FI in the context of... Read full article

Emotional Distress in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

Christina Ramsenthaler

Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a leading cause of death, with a rising prevalence. The disease has a high symptom burden and a negative impact on patients’ quality of life. However, as a result of difficulties in prognostication in relation to CHF, palliative care services do not always become involved... Read full article

Understanding Nurse And Patient Perceptions Of A ‘Good Death’

Miranda Paddy

The generally accepted principles of a good death among Western health and social care professionals include that the patient is: pain and symptom free; treated as an individual and with dignity and respect; involved in decision-making; prepared for and accepts the imminence of death; surrounded by loved ones in familiar... Read full article

Patients’ Experiences Of Fatigue In The End Stages Of Renal Disease

Kate Critchley

The number of patients diagnosed with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing annually and will continue to rise as a result of the ageing population. Research exploring the symptom burden in ESRD has shown it to be equal to that of the symptom burden experienced by patients with terminal cancer.... Read full article

Faecal Incontinence in Advanced Dementia: The Nursing Role

Nykki Hetherton

Faecal incontinence is one of the prognostic indicators for the terminal stages of dementia. However, there is minimal information on this distressing symptom in the context of cognitive decline. Faecal incontinence in dementia is often under-reported, under-estimated and poorly assessed and managed, despite being a potentially treatable condition. It has... Read full article

Heart-Failure Patients’ Thoughts and Fears Concerning Dying

Kimberley Reeman, Helen Noble

Patients with heart failure experience a variety of reactions to living with a chronic yet terminal disease. These range from acceptance of death to fear of death. Heart-failure patients have a high symptom burden, which adversely affects their quality of life. Patients are very concerned about the burden that their... Read full article

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