End of Life Care article archives © Schofield Healthcare Media Ltd

All content from End of Life Care is reproduced with the kind permission of Healthcomm UK Limited, former publishers of the End of Life Care Journal

Search the article archives

Gold standards framework

The GSF Competency Document

Published: 2010 Vol: 4 No: 2
Author(s):
Nikki Sawkins, Rosaleen Bawn
Implementing education that results in a change in culture and improved clinical practice is challenging. In order to evaluate the effect of educational initiatives it is necessary to assess pre-course proficiency levels with post-course proficiency levels. The Gold Standards Framework (GSF) competency document, which was originally developed to assess the palliative care educational needs of...
Clinical practice development

Facilitating a complex discharge from an acute hospital to home

Published: 2009 Vol: 3 No: 3
Author(s):
Claire S Nunn
Facilitating discharge home from hospital is part of everyday practice for nurses. However, achieving effective discharge home for a patient with complex end-of-life care needs, with an uncertain prognosis, requires communication, coordination and provision of equipment. If such discharges are to succeed, commitment is required from all involved. They may challenge the values and beliefs of...
Clinical practice development

Educational needs: palliative care link nurses in care homes

Published: 2008 Vol: 2 No: 3
Author(s):
Lynne Partington, Helen Langhorn, Katherine Froggatt
Many frail older people are being cared for in care homes until their death. Nurses who work in these environments are looking after residents with increasingly complex needs. Care home staff may benefit from the inclusion of palliative care support within their practice. Palliative care support may be encouraged in a number of ways. It needs to be responsive, flexible and appropriate to the...
Clinical practice development

Ethics and the law: injections, best interests and duty of care

Published: 2008 Vol: 2 No: 4
Author(s):
Rob George, Bridgit Dimond
Clinical practice development

Why families complain about end-of-life care in the NHS

Published: 2007 Vol: 1 No: 2
Author(s):
Susan Lowson
Most complaints are made following the death of a patient. It is the author's observation that, at times, healthcare professionals find it difficult to communicate effectively with the family and friends of patients who are dying. This can, on occasion, give rise to complaints about the care that the patient has received. All nurses should strive for excellence in end-of-life care. This article...
Personal narrative

The other side of the sheets: witnessing the slow death of my father

Published: 2010 Vol: 4 No: 3
The aim of this section is to provide a forum for healthcare professionals and others to describe their experiences (good or substandard) of the death of a friend or family member. The objective is to highlight for readers examples of nursing/multidisciplinary management during the dying process in order to encourage reflective practice. The authors will remain anonymous in order to protect...
Clinical practice development

Ethics and the law: mental incapacity at the end of life

Published: 2007 Vol: 1 No: 1
Author(s):
Rob George, Bridgit Dimond
We begin this regular feature on ethical and legal issues with the story of Jane. There are two reasons for analysing her case. First, Jane's situation is common, and second, between April and October 2007, the Mental Capacity Act 2005 comes into force. This law has wide-ranging implications for carers of patients who may be incapable of making decisions for themselves. The main features of the...
Clinical practice development

Ethics and the law: artifical hydration at the end of life

Published: 2009 Vol: 3 No: 1
Author(s):
Rob George, Bridgit Dimond
The case highlighted in this article is interesting and important (see Case scenario box). It refers to a clinical decision to withhold artificial hydration from a patient at the very end stages of multiple sclerosis. The withholding of fluids and food from a dying patient is not something about which everyone feels comfortable. There was disagreement within the multidisciplinary team regarding...
Gold standards framework

The GSF Prognostic Indicator Guidance

Published: 2010 Vol: 4 No: 1
Author(s):
Professor Keri Thomas
One of the major barriers to the delivery of good-quality end-of-life care is the fact that people who are approaching the end of their lives are not identified at an early enough stage. Consequently, they and their families are not provided with the support they need. This may lead to poor care provision, inappropriate hospital admissions, preventable suffering or crisis events. This is a...
Personal narrative

The other side of the sheets: the 'can't do' culture in the NHS

Published: 2010 Vol: 4 No: 2
The aim of this section is to provide a forum for healthcare professionals to describe their experiences (good or substandard) of the death of a friend or family member. The objective is to highlight for readers examples of nursing/multidisciplinary management during the dying process in order to encourage reflective practice. The authors will remain anonymous in order to protect confidentiality...
Personal narrative

The other side of the sheets: discharging my father from hospital

Published: 2009 Vol: 3 No: 3
The aim of this section is to provide a forum for healthcare professionals to describe their experiences (good or substandard) of the death of a friend or family member. The objective is to highlight for readers examples of nursing/multidisciplinary management during the dying process in order to encourage reflective practice. The authors will remain anonymous in order to protect confidentiality...
Nursing assignment

Proposed update to the LCP: children with dying parents

Published: 2008 Vol: 2 No: 2
Author(s):
Rebecca Blackwell
This article is based on a student assignment, the aim of which was to update a clinical framework or guideline in use within the student’s workplace. The framework that forms the basis of this article is the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP). The section of the LCP that is updated relates to the care of families. This part of the LCP neglects to provide guidance for the care of...
Clinical practice development

Role of occupational therapy in care of terminal patients

Published: 2008 Vol: 2 No: 4
Author(s):
Jennifer Miller, Jill Cooper
The occupational therapist (OT) maximises patients’ quality of life, by the use of equipment, adaptations to the home environment, education regarding the management of symptoms and the resultant deficits, plus ongoing support and collaboration with the patient, carers and members of the multiprofessional team. Within palliative and end-of-life care, OT interventions must be prompt due to...
Clinical practice development

User involvement in EoLC: how involved can patients/carers be?

Published: 2008 Vol: 2 No: 4
Author(s):
Joanna Black
Patient and carer involvement is also known as patient and public involvement and service user or user involvement. It is now a legal requirement and is encouraged in national guidance. Patients and carers, however, cannot fail to be involved in end-of-life care as it is their experience. In view of this, the significance of legislation and guidance stating that patients and carers have a right...
Clinical practice development

Introduction to the preferred place (priorities) of Care Tool

Published: 2007 Vol: 1 No: 2
Author(s):
Les Storey
This article provides, through discussion and case scenarios, an introduction to the development and implementation of the Preferred Place of Care (PPC) tool. This document has been developed to help facilitate patient/carer/healthcare professional discussions about choices at the end of life with regard to, for example, place of care and treatment alternatives. To reflect the nature of the...
Personal narrative

The other side of the sheets: Dismay at the neglect of a dying father

Published: 2008 Vol: 2 No: 1
The aim of this section is to provide a forum for healthcare professionals to describe their experiences (good or substandard) of the death of a friend or family member. The objective is to provide readers with examples of nursing/multidisciplinary management during the dying process in order to encourage reflective practice. The authors will remain anonymous in order to protect confidentiality....
Professional review

Should ward nurses hide death from patients?

Published: 2007 Vol: 1 No: 1
Author(s):
Liz Bryan
In Western society, death and dying are generally viewed with anxiety and discomfort. This has created reluctance to speak about death, especially in hospitals, where the intention is to sustain life not facilitate death. The assumption is often made that patients prefer not to be exposed to the death of another patient and that they may even be traumatised by the experience. However, a...
Personal narrative

The other side of the sheets: caring for my dying father at home

Published: 2009 Vol: 3 No: 1
The aim of this section is to provide a forum for healthcare professionals to describe their experiences (good or substandard) of the death of a friend or family member. The objective is to provide readers with examples of nursing/multidisciplinary management during the dying process in order to encourage reflective practice. The authors will remain anonymous in order to protect confidentiality....

Pages

Copyright ©2014 St Christopher's Hospice, registered Charity 210667